Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools

 

 

 

 
     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You are here: Home / PDFs on demand / Bibliographical References of PDFs on demand / Mass accumulations of mammoth (mammoth 'graveyards') with indications of past human activity in the northern Yana-Indighirka lowland, Arctic Siberia

V. Pitulko, E. Pavlova and A. Basilyan (2016)

Mass accumulations of mammoth (mammoth 'graveyards') with indications of past human activity in the northern Yana-Indighirka lowland, Arctic Siberia

Quaternary International, 406:202–217.

In recent years, new accumulations of mammoth faunal remains have been discovered in the northern part of the Yana-Indighirka lowland. Such areas are referred to as "mammoth graveyards" since the discovery of the Berelekh complex of geoarchaeological locales. It's been determined that all of these locales contain various amounts of evidence of past human activity associated with the use of bone accumulations as a valuable raw material source (mammoth ivory). These locales indicate that humans were widely spread in Arctic Siberia during the Late Pleistocene (MIS 3 and 2). At least some of these sites could have formed as a result of ancient people hunting mammoths. In this article we discuss two newly discovered sites, which currently represent the northernmost evidence of human presence in the Arctic at the end of the Pleistocene. They were found in the Maksunuokha River valley, to the south of the Shirokostan Peninsula. The Urez-22 site (MKR/U22) is located at 71 degrees 42' N and is currently the northernmost Paleolithic site in the world. The Lake Nikita site (NKL) is situated 40 km away from Urez-22, and both sites contain numerous remains of mammoth. The NKL site material represents the earlier of the two ancient human habitation episodes. This site's age is estimated at similar to 13,800 to 13,600 years ago. The NKL site is a complete chronological and cultural "duplicate" of the Berelekh site, which points to a relatively wide spread of this culture in Northeast Asia. NewWorld implements, similar to those found at the Berelekh site and NKL, are known as the Chindadn points. At this point, they represent the only tangible evidence of the cultural connection between the materials from Northeast Asia and Northwest North America. The age of Urez-22 can be estimated at the time slice of similar to 14,900 to 13,900 years ago. Archaeological material was encountered in redeposited concentrations, created by a low-energy stream. Artifacts from Urez-22 demonstrate the spread of microblade industry, older than the early Holocene, for the first time in the Siberian Arctic. This new material indicates noticeable cultural originality of the region during the Late Paleolithic and promises success in the future search for Paleolithic sites in the Yana-Indighirka lowland. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA. All rights reserved.

Arctic Siberia, Mammoth exploitation, rhs site, area, Accumulations of mammoth, Upper Palaeolithic, age, environment, paleolithic site, woolly mammoth, Western Beringia, extinction, Late Pleistocene, moravia, last glacial maximum
WOS:000376532400016
Year

1875 1876 1877 1878 1879
1880 1881 1882 1883 1884
1885 1886 1887 1888 1889
1890 1891 1892 1893 1894
1895 1896 1897 1898 1899

1900 1901 1902 1903 1904
1905 1906 1907 1908 1909
1910 1911 1912 1913 1914
1915 1916 1917 1918 1919
1920 1921 1922 1923 1924

1925 1926 1927 1928 1929
1930 1931 1932 1933 1934
1935 1936 1937 1938 1939
1940 1941 1942 1943 1944
1945 1946 1947 1948 1949

1950 1951 1952 1953 1954
1955 1956 1957 1958 1959
1960 1961 1962 1963 1964
1965 1966 1967 1968 1969
1970 1971 1972 1973 1974

1975 1976 1977 1978 1979
1980 1981 1982 1983 1984
1985 1986 1987 1988 1989
1990 1991 1992 1993 1994
1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004
2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
2020 2021 2022 2023 2024

 
e-ressources

 

PDFs on demand
 

 

 

RBINS private PDFs