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R. Heltsley, W. Cope, D. Shea, R. Bringolf, T. Kwak and E. Malindzak (2005)

Assessing organic contaminants in fish: Comparison of a nonlethal tissue sampling technique to mobile and stationary passive sampling devices

Environmental Science & Technology, 39(19):7601-7608.

As concerns mount over the human health risks associated with consumption of fish contaminated with persistent organic pollutants, there exists a need to better evaluate fish body burdens without lethally sampling many of the important commercial and sport species of interest. The aim of this study was to investigate two novel methods for estimating organic Contaminants in fish that are a concern for both fish and human health. The removal of fish adipose fins, commonly done in mark-recapture studies with salmonid species,was evaluated as a nonlethal sampling technique to estimate concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in flathead catfish (Pylodictis olivaris), relative to those found in muscle fillets of the same fish. We also assessed the efficacy of using poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) as a mobile passive sampling device (PSD) attached directly to wild flathead catfish for assessing location-specific exposure of the fish to waterborne contaminants. The results of this study have demonstrated for the first time that organic contaminant concentrations in adipose fin were highly correlated (R-2 = 0.87) with muscle fillet concentrations, indicating that the adipose fin of certain fishes may be used to accurately estimate tissue concentrations without the need for lethal sampling. Moreover, mobile PSDs attached directly to fish and used here for the first time accurately estimated ultratrace concentrations of waterborne PCBs and UPS without any apparent harm to the fish, indicating that there are no practical or physical barriers to the use of mobile passive samplers attached to aquatic organisms. Among the many practical implications of this research, two potential priority items include the analysis of organic contaminants in farm-raised and sport fish intended for human consumption, without the economic and population

polychlorinated biphenyl congeners, mono-ortho, uptake kinetics, global assessment, food-web, brown trout, adipose fin, semipermeable-membrane devices, polycyclic aromatic-hydrocarbons, salmo-trutta
WOS:000232410000043
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