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Emmanuel Emelogu, Pat Pollard, Craig Robinson, Foppe Smedes, Lynda Webster, Ian Oliver, Craig McKenzie, T. Seiler, Henner Hollert and Colin Moffat (2013)

Investigating the significance of dissolved organic contaminants in aquatic environments: Coupling passive sampling with in vitro bioassays

Chemosphere, 90(2):210-219.

We investigated the feasibility of coupling passive sampling and in vitro bioassay techniques for both chemical and ecotoxicological assessment of complex mixtures of organic contaminants in water. Silicone rubber passive sampling devices (SR-PSDs) were deployed for 8-9 weeks in four streams and an estuary of an agricultural catchment in North East (NE) Scotland. Extracts from the SR-PSDs were analysed for freely dissolved hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) and screened for wide range of pesticides. The total concentrations of dissolved PAHs (Sigma PAH(40), parent and branched) in the water column of the catchment varied from 38 to 69 ng L-1, whilst PCBs (Sigma PCB32) ranged 0.02-0.06 ng L-1. A number and level of pesticides and acid/urea herbicides of varying hydrophobicity (log K(OW)s similar to 2.25 to similar to 5.31) were also detected in the SR extracts, indicating their occurrence in the catchment. The acute toxicity and EROD induction potentials of SR extracts from the study sites were evaluated with rainbow trout liver (Oncorhynchus mykiss; RTL-W1) cell line. Acute cytotoxicity was not observed in cells following 48 h exposure to the SR extracts using neutral red uptake assay as endpoint. But, on a sublethal level, for every site, statistically significant EROD activity was observed to some degree following 72 h exposure to extracts, indicating the presence of compounds with dioxin-like effect that are bioavailable to aquatic organisms in the water bodies of the catchment. Importantly, only a small fraction of the EROD induction could be attributed to the PAHs and PCBs that were determined. This preliminary study demonstrates that the coupling of silicone rubber passive sampling techniques with in vitro bioassays is feasible and offers a cost effective early warning signal on water quality deterioration. Crown Copyright (C) 2012 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

liver-cell line, water, Hydrophobic organic contaminants, Monitoring, sediments, samplers, Water, Passive sampling, Toxic equivalency (TEQ), polychlorinated-biphenyls, dioxin-like compounds, Silicone rubber, river, polycyclic aromatic-hydrocarbons, organochlorine pesticides, receptor agonists
WOS:000312618300011
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