Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools

 

 

 

 
     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Log in


Forgot your password?
You are here: Home / PDFs on demand / Bibliographical References of PDFs on demand / Investigating the significance of dissolved organic contaminants in aquatic environments: Coupling passive sampling with in vitro bioassays

Emmanuel Emelogu, Pat Pollard, Craig Robinson, Foppe Smedes, Lynda Webster, Ian Oliver, Craig McKenzie, T. Seiler, Henner Hollert and Colin Moffat (2013)

Investigating the significance of dissolved organic contaminants in aquatic environments: Coupling passive sampling with in vitro bioassays

Chemosphere, 90(2):210-219.

We investigated the feasibility of coupling passive sampling and in vitro bioassay techniques for both chemical and ecotoxicological assessment of complex mixtures of organic contaminants in water. Silicone rubber passive sampling devices (SR-PSDs) were deployed for 8-9 weeks in four streams and an estuary of an agricultural catchment in North East (NE) Scotland. Extracts from the SR-PSDs were analysed for freely dissolved hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) and screened for wide range of pesticides. The total concentrations of dissolved PAHs (Sigma PAH(40), parent and branched) in the water column of the catchment varied from 38 to 69 ng L-1, whilst PCBs (Sigma PCB32) ranged 0.02-0.06 ng L-1. A number and level of pesticides and acid/urea herbicides of varying hydrophobicity (log K(OW)s similar to 2.25 to similar to 5.31) were also detected in the SR extracts, indicating their occurrence in the catchment. The acute toxicity and EROD induction potentials of SR extracts from the study sites were evaluated with rainbow trout liver (Oncorhynchus mykiss; RTL-W1) cell line. Acute cytotoxicity was not observed in cells following 48 h exposure to the SR extracts using neutral red uptake assay as endpoint. But, on a sublethal level, for every site, statistically significant EROD activity was observed to some degree following 72 h exposure to extracts, indicating the presence of compounds with dioxin-like effect that are bioavailable to aquatic organisms in the water bodies of the catchment. Importantly, only a small fraction of the EROD induction could be attributed to the PAHs and PCBs that were determined. This preliminary study demonstrates that the coupling of silicone rubber passive sampling techniques with in vitro bioassays is feasible and offers a cost effective early warning signal on water quality deterioration. Crown Copyright (C) 2012 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

liver-cell line, water, Hydrophobic organic contaminants, Monitoring, sediments, samplers, Water, Passive sampling, Toxic equivalency (TEQ), polychlorinated-biphenyls, dioxin-like compounds, Silicone rubber, river, polycyclic aromatic-hydrocarbons, organochlorine pesticides, receptor agonists
WOS:000312618300011
Year

1875 1876 1877 1878 1879
1880 1881 1882 1883 1884
1885 1886 1887 1888 1889
1890 1891 1892 1893 1894
1895 1896 1897 1898 1899

1900 1901 1902 1903 1904
1905 1906 1907 1908 1909
1910 1911 1912 1913 1914
1915 1916 1917 1918 1919
1920 1921 1922 1923 1924

1925 1926 1927 1928 1929
1930 1931 1932 1933 1934
1935 1936 1937 1938 1939
1940 1941 1942 1943 1944
1945 1946 1947 1948 1949

1950 1951 1952 1953 1954
1955 1956 1957 1958 1959
1960 1961 1962 1963 1964
1965 1966 1967 1968 1969
1970 1971 1972 1973 1974

1975 1976 1977 1978 1979
1980 1981 1982 1983 1984
1985 1986 1987 1988 1989
1990 1991 1992 1993 1994
1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004
2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
2020 2021 2022 2023 2024

 
e-ressources

 

PDFs on demand
 

 

 

RBINS private PDFs